Tag Archives | Writings

Shades of Green(Lifestyle) Awards Reflection

logo-bigWhile gardening alone in the Spring busy period without the need to plan and direct volunteers, I have had more time for reflection. One of the subjects for reflection was my elevation to the Green Lifestyle Hall of Fame.

By chance I had just read a series of articles by Kari McGregor using a framework for thinking about green activism that seemed relevant to this award.

Kari McGregor’s categories of environmentalism Light Green, Bright Green, Deep Green and Dark Green made sense of my musings.

Light Green, is about relatively modest changes in our personal lifestyles that will collectively lead to a more environmentally sane and sustainable society.

Bright Green, is based on a belief that renewable and smart technology will create the next industrial revolution that will allow society to continue the path of progress that is so fundamental to our collective culture. Both these strains of environmentalism remain anthropocentric while Deep and Dark Green environmentalism assert humanity must develop an eco-centric culture to survive.

Deep Green environmentalists focus on protecting nature by direct action and radical political activism while Dark Greens focus on building the ecological successor culture now in the belief that industrial civilization is doomed to run its course and collapse either dramatically or slowly.

In this framework Green Lifestyle Magazine is primarily Light Green with a fair dose of Bright Green. I wondered where to position the previous recipients of the Hall of Fame award. Bob Brown might be more Deep Green while Olivia Newton John’s stellar celebrity and financial success might suggest a blend of Light and Bright Green (even though I know very little of her environmental activism). I fit more squarely in with the Dark Greens. While my Dark Green perspective may seem most removed from Green Lifestyle’s Light Green environmentalism, we share the focus on change the world by changing ourselves while the Bright Green renewable energy and climate policy activists such as Mark Descendorf, and Philip Sutton share the belief in changing the nature of the system with the more radical direct action activists such as Paul Watson (founder of Sea Shepherd) even if the methods used to bring about structural change are very different and that these activists can be placed on either side of the anthropocentric and eco-centric divide.

pip3The point of Kari’s essay was that all four perspectives have their strengths and weaknesses and that we should all do more to acknowledge the value of the perspectives. She suggests that commitment to social justice is a shared if not strongly articulated value behind all four shades of green that could be more strongly recognized and articulated. In this context I thought about how new PIP magazine which I have strongly supported is just a slightly more radical version of the Light Green environmentalism on show in Green Lifestyle mag.

 

Permaculture as a brand of Australian environmentalism does focus on what we can do to look after the environment and future generations as we become more self reliant, productive and resilient individually, in our households and communities. Maybe permaculture can be viewed as a low eco-tech version of Bright Green that will allow us to live fulfilled lives without today’s systems or consumption of resources. But my Future Scenarios work let alone my more recent controversial essay Crash on Demand; Welcome to the Brown Tech World have suggested to some that I have shifted from optimist to pessimist about the future of humanity. I don’t think my perspective has shifted that much other than a response to what I see as the declining options available to future generations as industrial civilization accelerates toward a collision with nature and its internal contradictions. In many ways Crash on Demand is a strong Dark Green critique of the Bright Green and Deep Green perspectives while I largely ignore the Light Green perspective as being far to weak a response to the ecological crisis.

Kari’s framework certainly helped me make sense of Green Lifestyle magazine’s award to me. As co-originator of the permaculture concept I was partly responsible for the positive can-do attitude to improving the environment, that is permaculture. My lifestyle of radical simplicity combined with household and communitarian sufficiency, is an uncomfortable one for most trying to do their bit to live a greener lifestyle. Compared to the two previous recipients of this award, Bob Brown and Olivia Newton John, I am definitely more of an extremist.   Still, I thought, it is normal in any network or subculture to look to radicals rather than moderates for inspiration. We acknowledge and respect those who go the extra mile to “walk the talk” even if that means a stronger ideological commitment or pig headed personality than most in the same subculture would believe reasonable.

Beyond this recognition of pioneering radicals, I thought my permaculture lifestyle of radical simplicity and sufficiency is more in line with mainstream consumer environmentalism than it is with mainstream political environmentalism. In the debate about the personal being political vs structural change to the “system” I obviously more associate with the first view while Bob Brown has devoted his life more to the second perspective which is characteristic of Kari’s Bright and Deep Green environmentalisms. Viewed through this lens my Crash On Demand essay is actually an appeal to all environmentalists to take seriously the idea that what we do in our own lives is potent but only if what we do is radical in its simplicity and abundant in its real biological and communitarian productivity. Thus there is a direct line of evolution of action from Light Green to Dark Green. I doubt whether Kari’s framework let alone my musings reflect the decisions of the judges at Green Lifestyle Mag but this award and Kari’s framework has certainly reminded me that all responses to the ecological crisis have value in ways that are not necessarily obvious.

2

Prologue to Chinese Edition of Principles(探索樸門)

0122-Permaculture-cover-1We are proud to announce that the release of the Chinese language edition of Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability by David Holmgren is imminent. To give you a sneak preview, here is the prologue to the edition prepared by David.

First in Chinese, and then in English to follow. 《探索樸門:超越永續的原則與道路》here we come. Any enquiries, please mail 大地旅人慧儀 <[email protected]>. The copies are available here.

 

作者中文版序
《探索樸門:超越永續的原則與道路》英文版發行已12年,期間世界也經歷了劇烈改變。在許多環保、經濟與社會的指標上,地方社群與全球體系正面臨危機,甚至瓦解。在本書「能源衰退期」必將來臨的前提下,那些導致今日工業化、現代化及全球化失敗的原則,無疑須由新思維取而代之。
樸門永續設計正是以創意回應能源耗竭的前鋒,因為自有證據開始顯示能源必將耗竭至今,此一設計系統的倫理與設計原則,已歷經了數十年的精進與測試。它無法協助拯救我們所知的舊世界,但能激發並提供眾多創意,以順應正在成形的新世界。
樸門始於澳洲,在當地及其它富裕已久的英語系國家歷史也最為悠久,其實其來有自,因為這些國家(仍屬少數)有較多時間瞭解「成長應否設限」此一難題,並開始發展及採用有別於傳統的土地用途與生活方式,以安然度過一個能源必竭的未來。
臺灣、香港及新加坡等華語系地區曾經歷快速的經濟成長,而在目睹急遽工業化、都市化與消費文化最好與最壞的一面後,自然會意識到成長應否設限的問題,並率先提出替代選擇。中國最近的爆炸性成長也提供了新契機,使如何面對成長的見解得以萌芽散播。這些體系無法永續,且其成長可能多由泡沫經濟所帶動,但也讓替代方法在泡沫破滅後有機會迅速普及。
對已經開始尋找生態設計創意的朋友而言,不論是身處最偏遠的鄉村或最新穎的市鎮,都可運用樸門永續設計的道德與設計原則輔助思考,並針對各種不同的情況,根據「首要原則」探索、評估、調整並開發策略與技術,以走出能源耗竭的困境。這些設計創意必將融合現代生態設計,以及化石燃料問世前帶動著家國的傳統智慧與生活方式。
人口密集雖然是一嚴峻挑戰,但仍然有助於樸門永續設計在華語系國家的快速拓展與演進。
首先,近數十年在政治、經濟與社會上的劇烈變化,使當地人民非常能夠適應環境,也願意接納新想法。這些新想法(如樸門)有許多源自西方,但僅少數會鼓勵人們重拾過去讓土地使用與生活方式得以永續的傳統智慧。
最近的富裕及都市化,尤其在中國,意味著仍有許多地方的居民知道如何以低衝擊的方式栽種食物、順應自然、建造居所並惜物愛物,而非汰舊買新,也繼續從事許多其它在化石燃料迅速遍及全球之前,那些較有益於自給自足和社群生活的活動。
相較於澳洲等富裕多年的國家,這是一大優勢,因為這些技能在當地大多早已失傳。樸門永續設計的倫理和設計原則能夠幫助我們的,不是如何倒退至過去,而是如何從傳統與現代去蕪存菁,在未來的能源耗竭中走出富足之路。
我相信這本書以中文發行,會讓許多人走進樸門,而為此我想感謝大地旅人環境工作室創辦人同時也是台灣樸門永續設計學會理事長的江慧儀女士決定將此書譯成中文,以及洪葛蘭設計服務的田中於過程中鼎力協助。
大衛.洪葛蘭
2014 年5 月

The world has changed radically in the 12 years since the publication of Permaculture: Principles & Pathways Beyond Sustainability in English. By many environmental, economic and social measures, local communities and global systems are in crisis and even collapse. The premise of this book that “the energy descent” future will inevitably require new ways of thinking to replace the now failing principles that have guided industralisation, modernity and globalisation.
Permaculture is at the forefront of this creative response to energy descent because it is based on ethics and design principles that have evolved and been tested over the decades since the evidence for the energy descent future first became clear. Permaculture will not help save the world as we know it, but it can inspire and inform a multitude of creative responses to the world that is emerging.
It is not surprising that permaculture has its origin and longest history in Australia and other long affluent English speaking countries where there has been more time for (a still small minority) to understand the “limits to growth” dilemma and begin developing and adopting the alternative ways of landuse and living that will be viable in the energy descent future.
In the Chinese speaking world, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore have naturally been the places where awareness of the “limits to growth” and the alternatives have been first to emerge after rapid economic growth created the best and worst outcomes of rapid industrialisation, urbanisation and consumer culture. The very recent nature of explosive growth in mainland China provides new opportunities for the emergence and spread of post growth ideas. The unsustainability of these systems and the likelihood that much of the growth has been driven by bubble economics, provides opportunities for alternative responses to spread rapidly once the bubble bursts.
For those already on the path of searching for creative ecological design solutions to the dilemmas of energy descent, permaculture ethics and design principles are thinking tools that help find, evaluate, refine and create from “first principles” the strategies and techniques that are appropriate to each and every situation from the most remote provences to the newest cities. Those design solutions will be some hybrid between modern ecological design and traditional wisdom and ways of living that sustained people and nations before the fossil fuel powered era.
While population density is a serious challenge, there are some advantages for the rapid spread and evolution of permaculture in the Chinese speaking world.
Firstly the radical political, economic and social changes of recent decades have made people very adaptable and able to consider new ideas. Many of those new ideas (like permaculture) come from the western world but few encourage people to rediscover the wisdom of traditional systems of sustainable landuse and ways of living.
The very recent nature of affluence and urbanisation, especially in mainland China means there are many places where people still have a working knowledge of low impact ways of growing food, working with nature, building houses, repairing old possessions rather than buying new ones, and the many other activities associated with more self-reliant and communitarian ways of living that existed before the fossil fuel powered global boom.
This is a great strength compared with many long affluent countries such as Australia where many of these skills have been lost generations ago. Rather than a retreat to the past, permaculture ethics and design principles help us sort the “wheat from the chaff” of both tradition and modernity for a prosperous way down in the energy descent future.
I trust that the publication of this book in Chinese will lead many people to permaculture and for that I want thank the publishers Hui-I Chiang (江慧儀) of Earth Passengers (大地旅人環境教育工作室)  and Taiwan Permaculture Institute (台灣樸門永續設計學會) for translation as well as Rick Tanaka at Holmgren Design for facilitation of the process.

David Holmgren
May 2013

0

Permaculture Activism and the Future

I was recently asked by “permaculture actionary” Delvin Solkinson to provide some words for a newsletter promoting the next Rainbow Serpent Festival at which I’ll be speaking (several times). Very normal that a previous participant at one of our Advanced Permaculture Principles Courses should be asking me for a piece for an event he has the job to promote. Except for the fact that Delvin is based in the rainforests of British Columbia, Canada and the event is Rainbow Serpent Festival, that is held each dry dusty January  in our bioregional backyard.elvishBYdesign

My reply was

“Delvin, You ask difficult questions. Attached are a few words for your “Trans Pacific Partnership” project producing a local festival mag from the west coast of Canada.”

Inevitably I said too much for Delvin to use in full, but he thought it should be available somewhere, so here it is.

 

 

What are the roots or foundations of Permaculture?
Permaculture emerged from the fusion and ferment of environmental thinking of the 1970’s. It can be thought of as applied systems ecology with a strong debt to the work of Howard Odum. In another sense it was a branch of the tree of organic agriculture, with roots in many industrialised countries, in the early 20th century informed by pioneering work on sustainable agriculture by F.H. King who wrote Farmers of  Forty Centuries; Permanent Agriculture in China, Japan and Korea.   The emphasis on perennial plants, especially trees, was strongly informed by Russell Smiths Tree Crops; A Permanent Agriculture and the resurgence in interest in Economic Botany (useful plants), and indigenous use of plants and land management.  As a social movement permaculture originated in the Counterculture  applying an activist strategy to create the world we wanted rather than fighting to stop the world we didn’t want.  Early “back to the land” self sufficiency efforts outside the mainstream economy provided a context for early application of permaculture concepts. Although not overtly political, permaculture was  influenced by  both Anarchist and Libertarian philosophies.

What is the best way to become a permaculture actionary or ‘get on the ground’ ?
There are many different entry points to becoming a “permaculture actionary”. For some it starts with books, for others it is social and practical immersion without over intellectualizing, for many it is a Permaculture Design Course. Whatever the starting point, it should become clear that the most important application of permaculture ethics and principles is to the self, through a process of self audit of our needs, wants, dependencies, creative and productive outputs and byproducts of our very existence. Getting grounded in this way is the start of a personal retro-fit or redesign process which does not require that we wait until we own land or are with the right crowd. We can be our own guinea pigs in creating a better world. It is not necessary to tell the whole world first up but it certainly helps to connect with like-minded people for ideas and inspiration in building skills and capacities to help ourselves and others adapt to a rapidly changing world.

What is the future of permaculture that you would most like to see?
My hopes for permaculture range from the most general to the most specific. As a concept I hope it continues to be informed and infused with creative thinking and activism that arises from outside its own self-referenced world . In this way it will avoid stagnation in thinking and action and continue to exhibit hybrid vigour that can respond to a rapidly changing world. This inclusive mentality that acknowledges like minded concepts and networks reduces the problems of “turf warfare” between pioneering concepts that colonise the psycho social margins of mainstream society.

This holistic “jack of all trades” scope of permaculture needs to be balanced by a “mastery of one”. For each of us the calling and contribution to a better world will be many and varied. My hope is that enough permaculture practitioners dedicate their lives to making the founding permaculture vision of truly productive bioregional tree crop agricultures a reality able to survive the rigours of climate change and energy descent. Can we do the hard yards such that reality can match the rhetoric?

These ideas are further explored in

About Permaculture

Reverence for the Bunya Bunya

Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability

Future Scenarios

Collected Writings

Essence of Permaculture

Or take part and learn in the Permaculture Design Certificate course.

 

1

Reverence for the bunya bunya

One of the critiques of permaculture is that, in attempting to be a theory of everything, it has failed to contribute real progress on any of the manifold fronts it addresses. Had Mollison and I spent our lives planting, managing and selecting oaks and bunya bunyas, we might have made a greater contribution to a benign energy descent future. On the other hand, we have inspired many others, a few of whom have contributed significantly to the still very slow expansion of knowledge of, breeding, and use of tree crops. Peter Brew was one of those few, a keen observer, independent thinker and energetic practitioner whose potential to contribute to a better energy descent future for humanity through tree crops, was cut short by personal misfortune exacerbated by an affluent but ignorant society unable to recognise, let alone reward, his genius. When Oliver and I harvest the first nuts from the Spring Creek Community Forest grove, I will start a new nursery bed to contribute to the hybrid vigour of the future bunya bunya groves of southern Australia to honour Peter’s contribution to an abundant future.

You can download the article Reverence for the bunya bunya (full text).

 

9

Food for thought, security and sovereignty

This is a longer version of the article David Holmgren contributed to the inaugural issue of the Pip magazine.

Food insecurity also shows up in affluent countries in many surprising ways.  In Australia declining backyard food production since the 1960s and the loss of community, reduced the opportunities for barter and social insurance from non-monetary exchange. In the decades since, increasing apartment living and smaller backyards has reduced the capacity for household food production. Multiple generations of wage, and even welfare dependence, has left many Australians without even the “skills of poverty”, including food gardening and home preserving.  In recent decades high debt levels have seen all household members commuting to work or school, leaving little time for food gardening, animal rearing and preserving.  The decline in home cooking and storage of food at home have increased dependence on 24/7 commercial food outlets which themselves have become monopolised and transport dependent.  The constant drive for greater efficiency and profits by food corporations has seen “Just In Time” logistics replace warehousing and storage in shops. Interruptions to supply chains from natural or economic disasters set up instant dependence of large populations on emergency relief on an unprecedented scale. Even without Peak Oil and Climate Change, the prospects of large numbers of people being food insecure in Australia increases inexorably due to the dysfunctions of multi-generational affluence. I wonder why people feel so comfortable relying on Coles as their personal food cupboard.

You can download here full text of Permaculture for food security and sovereignty.

2

Food Security and Sovereignty

PIP-Cover-issue-1LR-e1395804611513 “It’s been ten years since Australia had its own permaculture magazine and since then we have had to rely on overseas publications to learn about permaculture and hear what other like-minded people are doing ” laments the founding editor of a new permaculture magazine, called Pip magazine. Nothing wrong with permaculture periodicals overseas, but when we consider that permaculture ‘originated’ in Australia and being tauted as one of the biggest exports of ideas from this country, it is a poor state of affairs nonetheless.

Despair no more Australians as Pip magazine will hit the market very soon. Pip is a brainchild of journalist, editor and photographer Robyn Rosenfeldt, a Melbourne native now a resident of far south east NSW. She and the team no doubt have exerted not an insignificant amount of passion, but as she notes, publishing was made possible by the generosity of the community through crowd-funding.

Pip magazine is not just another gardening magazine, just like permaculture is not just about gardening. Permaculture is a design system that can be applied to all aspects of life to enable us to live more sustainably. It starts in the home and garden and is about creating systems that are self-reliant. But it extends right out to broad acre farming, to community development and beyond.

The first issue has stories on how to grow your own shiitake mushrooms, create a food forest, herbal first aid, natural dyes and creating a clothes swap in your own community, as well as a piece on food security and sovereignty contributed by David Holmgren.

Below we publish a short excerpt from his piece. Please get hold of the magazine, available at good newsagents and retail outlets, to get the whole story, and better still, subscribe to it here. The Pip mag is also available digitally across all devices. The second issue is due out in September.

The inaugural issue is available for purchase at our online shop.

Food insecurity also shows up in affluent countries. In Australia, declining backyard food growing and home cooking since the 1960s  has increased dependence on 24/7 food outlets which are car transport dependent and increasingly monopolised.  The loss of community has reduced the ‘social insurance’ from non-monetary exchange of surpluses.  Interruptions to supply chains from natural or economic disasters set up instant dependence of large populations on emergency relief on unprecedented scale. Even without Peak Oil and Climate Change, the prospects of large numbers of people being food insecure in Australia increases inexorably due to the dysfunction of multi-generational affluence. I wonder why people feel so comfortable relying on the supermarket as their personal food cupboard.

Gunther Food Energy

Graphics from the “Relocalising Our Food using Permaculture Theory and Practice at Sustainable and Fair Food” presentation (Feb 2014), based on Folke Günter, 2001.

Applying permaculture principles to food production changes the way we produce food and how much we store, preserve, transport, distribute, prepare and consume.  Beyond the dinner table, permaculture design reorganises the supply chain to ensure all wastes including human waste are recycled to food producing land. These closed loop cycles are easier and more energy efficient when organised at the household and local scale.  Growing at home increases food security in many overlapping and self-reinforcing ways.

Firstly it is relatively easy to produce perishable vegetables, fruit and small livestock products using organic methods that recycle household and local wastes. These foods might not be staples but they reduce the food bill, diversify the diet and improve everyone’s health, both in the production and the consumption.

Secondly, home-grown food gives a sense of pride and sufficiency, builds skills and confidence to scale up if necessary, generates surplus for preserving that increase household food storages while gifting and barter further increase your credit with others.  All these processes help reboot the household and community economies that were once the background to the monetary economy. History shows us that whenever the monetary economy takes a dive, the household and community economics grow rapidly.

0

Crash on Demand: interviews and a summary

Requests for David Holmgren to do interviews keep coming in following the publication of his latest essay “Crash on Demand”. He has done a couple so far, in an attempt to answer some of the questions raised by the fellow travellers. Click on the links below to listen to what he has to say.

Agricultural Innovations with Frank Aragona part 1: Crash on Demand) (Sept 29, 2014) and part2: Pathways to intentional communities (Oct 6, 2014)

With David Holmgren on his essay ‘Crash on Demand’ with Stefan Geyer (21st century permaculture) originally broadcast on Feb 2, 2014 on London’s Shoreditch radio.

Crash on Demand with Alex Smith (Ecoshock Radio), also features Nicole Foss.

In the follow up email exchanges, Alex Smith from Ecoshock Radio raised a further question which was not covered in his interview.

Is David saying that the system will crash anyway and by scaling up permaculture activities will fasten the inevitable, or is he really calling for non-violent efforts to crash the economic system,  to save the planet, or is not calling for that? To answer that, he has compiled what could be termed as a concise summary of “Crash on Demand”. You can download the text here. We recommend you to read the whole essay first, though.

Crash on Demand, a concise version

See also the following video filmed for Pip Australian permaculture magazine, “How you can change the world with permaculture”. It shows David presenting a more positive take on what is essentially the same message as “Crash On Demand”.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVS45dbNL-E&w=560&h=315]

4

Crash on Demand, the discussion so far

Since the publication, David Holmgren’s essay “Crash on Demand” has generated a heated debate among the sustainability communities around the world. We try to keep up with the discussion in the cyber world as much as possible (but if we missed any other articles and blogposts, please let us know).  Below, we compile the list of articles and posts we have come across (so far) all worth reading, including most of the comments (last updated on May 15, 2015).

υγεία (mediterranean food) Permaculture, also on the grokking eagle.
Silvia Di Blasio (Mainstream Permaculture) Teaching permaculture: what is permaculture for.

David Pllard (how to save the world) How our narratives inform our hopes for change also on Resilience.org.

Mary Logan (A prosperous way down) Fitting into nature–or not (see comments).

Norris Thomlinson (Farmer Scrub’s blog) Demand Crash! – a response to Holmgren’s “Crash on Demand”.

Chris McLeod Let’s talk about collapse.

Silvia Di Blasio (Living As If Others Really Mattered) Emphasizing the wrong “E”, Follow up on COD, and why it is worth continuing the discussion.

Dimitry Orlov (ClubOrlov) David Holmgren’s Crash on Demand also on Resilience.org.

John Michael Greer (The Archdruid Report) A bargain with the Archdruid also on Resilience.org.

Kevin O’Conner (C-Realm) Dirty Pool: A Response to Guy McPherson.

Joanne Poyourow (on Transition US) Economic descent, hopefully with skillful means also on Resilience.org. and Collapse? Maybe not also on Resilience.org.

Erik Lindberg (Transition Milwaukee) Agency on Demand? Holmgren, Hopkins and the historical problem of agency also on Resilience.org.

Rob Hopkins (Transition Culture) Holmgren’s “Crash on Demand”: be careful what you wish for also on Resilience.org.
His more recent piece Reflections on being a “cultural optimist” and a month of scaling up also  on Resilience.org.

Jason Heppenstall (22 billion energy slaves) Stabbing the beast also on Resilience.org.

David MacLeod (Integral Permaculture) Crash on Demand: David Holmgren updates his future scenarios also on Resilience.org.
His later piece What is David Holmgren really telling us also on Resilience.org.
His latest post David Holmgren: “I haven’t really changed my message” also on Resilience.org.

Nicole Foss (the Automatic Earth) Crash on Demand? A response to David Holmgren.

RCollapseniks.005

Albert Bates (the Great Change) Charting Collapseniks also on Resilience.org.
his update “recharting collapseniks.

 

 

18

Crash on Demand: Welcome to the Brown Tech Future

Slide16In Crash on Demand, David Holmgren not only updates Future Scenarios (2007) work but also builds on his essay Money vs Fossil Energy: The battle for control of the world (2009), as a running commentary on the rapid changes in the big picture context for permaculture activism, especially in the Australian context.  It assumes understanding of these previous works and, of course permaculture.  ‘Preaching to the choir’ it may be, but hopefully it contributes new perspectives to keep permaculture activists ahead of the game.

Permaculture teaching and activism have always aimed to work with those already interested in changing their lives, land and communities for the better, rather than proselytising the disinterested majority.  Over many decades, idealistic youth have responded positively to the ‘can-do’, personal empowerment of permaculture design, but it has also attracted more experienced citizens disillusioned with top down mainstream environmentalism’s failure to stop the juggernaut of consumer capitalism.  Similarly, disillusioned social and political activists are just starting to recognise permaculture as a potentially effective pathway for societal change as 20th century style mass movements seem to have lost their potency.

David’s argument is essentially that radical, but achievable, behaviour change from dependent consumers to responsible self-reliant producers (by some relatively small minority of the global middle class) has a chance of stopping the juggernaut of consumer capitalism from driving the world over the climate change cliff.  It maybe a slim chance, but a better bet than current herculean efforts to get the elites to pull the right policy levers; whether by sweet promises of green tech profits or alternatively threats from mass movements shouting for less consumption.

Crash on demand (2Mg pdf)

A Spanish translation (by Silvia Di Blasio, Daniel Mendez and Hernán Del Vecchio): Colapso por Encargo.

In Turkish (translated by Suat Ertüzün): Kahverengi Teknoloji Çağı’na Hoş Geldiniz.

See the discussion this essay has created.

See also the intervies and a summary.


Future Scenarios: How communities can adapt to Peak Oil and Climate Change
Also available:

Future Scenarios: How communities can adapt to Peak Oil and Climate Change – the book

In it David outlines four scenarios that bring to life the likely cultural, political, agricultural, and economic implications of peak oil and climate change, and the generations-long era of “energy descent” that faces us.

 

68

Vale Errol Mutch

Errol

Errol Mutch explaining the worm composting system at Edendale Farm August 2003.

I never knew Errol very well but from my first meeting in the early 1990s when he was  the manager at Edendale City Farm in Eltham. I was impressed by the man, and what he and Cheryl had done to transform Edendale from an derelict animal pound to a great example of progressive environmental education. From that first time I was shown around the farm (as a consultant to the shire council) to hearing him sprouk to groups of school children or the public at field days, I recognised Errol as having that rare combination of  decades of farming experience with a passion for biodynamics and permaculture that I was more used to seeing in young environmentalists from urban backgrounds.

The development of Edendale as a public environmental education facility was of course shaped by all the usual factors of funding priorities, politics, bureaucracy and fashions but it also showed the care and attention of Errol and Cheryl’s stewardship that we usually associate with a well loved and cared-for private property. The animal systems in particular were exemplary in not only their good management but also in the significant contribution to maintenance of working strains of heritage rare breeds.

It was a tragedy of the times that this work was never recognised for its significant contribution to biodiversity conservation as defined by the UN Convention on Biodiversity. More than lack of recognition the progressive common sense environmentalism that Errol has demonstrated was undermined and dismantled by bureaucrats reflecting the “nativist” version of biodiversity that was so strong at Nillumbik shire council at the time.

To quote from a letter of support that I wrote in November 2004,

…..the best examples of the pragmatic and productive approach to sustainable land use, such as Edendale are subject to constant erosion by a nativist orthodoxy which dominates all levels of policy making and environmental education (not only at Nillumbik)  It seems ironic that the “state of the art” cost effective land and water management at Edendale with multiple environmental and social value outcomes is to be downgraded while much more expensive indigenous revegetation programs with questionable and unproven water quality and other environmental benefits are retained and reinforced.  The proposed removal of pigs from Edendale and downgrading of the poultry breeding systems without reference to independent evaluation by those with expertise in city farms is analogous to planting oak or pine trees in the shire’s best wildflower reserve without consulting experts in remnant indigenous biodiversity management. 
 
Edendale is one of the last places in Australia where a functional strain of  the Australorp poultry breed is being maintained. This is an Australian contribution to domesticated animal biodiversity and incidentally most of the original breeding and maintenance of the Australorp was in Nillumbik (at Research). Under the UN Convention on Biodiversity this flock constitute “threatened in-situ domesticated biodiversity”. Therefore Australian governments have a legally binding responsibility to conserve this flock.  While these responsibilities are not well known (your environmental staff may not be aware of this) it is an opportunity for Nillumbik to apply for funding to support the excellent biodiversity conservation work at Edendale.

I remember Errol as one of those rare “salt of the earth” natural environmentalists, who charted his own path in working with nature though the difficult decades when such ideas were rare and ignored, to then find a collegiate network of like minded people through the biodynamic, organic and permaculture networks, and finally to become a wise elder inspiring children and adults to find their own path in working with nature.

 

(Errol passed away peacefully Oct. 9, 2013 Aged 71 years.)

0