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Permaculture activism in the Brown Tech Future

Keynote Address to 12th Australasian Permaculture Convergence

Penguin Tasmania  March 2015

Outline

Over the last 8 years David Holmgren’s Future Scenarios work has provided a framework through which permaculture, transition and kindred activists have better understood, navigated and even taken advantage of the chaotic changes unfolding in our world driven by peaking resources, environmental tipping points, economic contraction and geopolitical instability.

His more recent (2013) essay Crash On Demand: Welcome to the Brown Tech Future triggered a global debate in the peak oil blogosphere and more locally (eg Great Debate at the Melbourne Sustainable Living Festival) about local adaption vs grand global plans.

In this keynote David Holmgren builds on the lessons of 40 years of permaculture and kindred activism to articulate how the bottom up permaculture strategies that focus at the personal, household, enterprise and community level can be effective where mass movements to demand top down change are repeatedly derailed or simply reinvent the problems in new forms ( the solution becomes the problem).

At a time when environmental activists are feeling increasingly embattled and desperate, the opportunities for permaculture have never been greater. Are we ready to use whatever agency remains at the personal, household and community level to turn the problems into solutions?

PDF of text

Permaculture design system and activism

Permaculture is a design system for sustainable land use and living.

It articulates and applies the design principles of nature in new ways appropriate to the energy descent era of industrial civilisation. These design principles are embedded in an ethical framework derived from the commonalities of indigenous and traditional cultures of place.

Permaculture activism uses global understanding to inform local action at the personal, household and community scale to create models capable of viral proliferation.

Permies seeks to create the world we do want by direct constructive action rather than stopping the world we don’t want by restrictive action. Permaculture’s popularity especially with environmentally aware youth over three generations can be partly attributed to a “good cop/bad cop” synergy with more conventional oppositional activism. Thus those who have done their time in direct action in the forest (or shale gas blockades) are often supported by those who spend their positive energy on the permablitz front line.

Similarly for more mature people, being the change we want to see in the world is far more empowering, than using all our capacity and credentials to push for policy change from the top down.

Pushback from conventional activism

While the support for permaculture and positive environmentalism in general has grown stronger in recent years, there is also a pushback from those committed to the top down and oppositional strategies. The argument is that composting your garden may be good for you but it does little to help bring about the necessary structural changes in society that, it is argued, can only come through big processes such as

  1. corporate capitalism making big bucks doing good,
  2. top down policy reforms driven fearless political leaders or
  3. mass movements threatening revolution to force change at the top.

Those committed to these pathways argue theirs is the best. Often the pathway of changing the world by changing ourselves is ignored or denigrated as self obsessed navel gazing.

In the permaculture movement the value of this DIY approach is taken for granted but permies often have difficulty in articulating to others why this approach is at least as important as the other three in shaping a more positive future for ourselves, humanity and nature.

I want to go one step further to articulate why the DIY and DIO (doing it ourselves) approaches of permaculture are the most efficient, resilient and empowering ways to focus our own limited power in the world.

Activism that is good for our bodies and our minds is fun and empowering, and makes us more self reliant, and resilient in the face of uncertain futures, is a much easier sell than activism that involves self sacrifice for some larger collective good. In this sense permaculture shares some common ground with green corporate capitalism’s focus on rewards as a motivation even if the rewards are primarily non monetary.

If our experiments in DIY self-reliance are successful, others without as much innovator tenacity can copy what we do without having to make so many mistakes. The issue of whether our solutions are scalable beyond the non monetary household and community economies to the monetary economy, let alone corporate capitalism is less important than whether our solution can replicate virally to achieve scale in numbers

Big solutions to big problems often recreate the problem in a new form. Small scale solutions have the advantage of being site and situation specific and being more amenable to incremental organic adaptation with less risk that failures causes higher order systemic failures. For example local raw milk Community Supported Agriculture system have some real (very low) risk of causing illness but large scale corporate supply systems of industrial milk have created problems where large numbers of people spread across countries become sick before corrective responses can be enacted.

In addition there is strong evidence many successful small business get started in the household and community economies of gift, exchange and reciprocity before growing into the monetary economy. In the future, two processes suggest this might be the main mechanism by which we grow a new monetary economy. Credit crunches from deflationary economics eliminate bank finance for small business so the bootstraps DIY approach is the only option. Secondly the capacity of governments to enforce regulatory barriers that currently stymie home producers going commercial, will be unsustainable.

What we do in our own households, with our family and informal community networks is simple and small scale so that it largely can occur

  1. without the permission of the banks who -through their lending – determine what does and what does not happen in the credit driven monetary economy,
  2. and without the knowledge of the corporate competitors who stand to lose market share,
  3. and mostly under the radar of the government regulators whose function is to secure the market for bank financed corporate investment.

The potential for mass adoption is the test that most political activists want to see before they will accept any value from DIY approaches. Can we persuade everyone to grow their own vegetables? What if everyone had a wood stove? Is there enough land in the city to grow all the food? How will it help us close down a brown coal power station?

Mainstream political action focuses on persuading the majority because the majority is always the biggest game in town. This focus on majorities is strategically useless for smaller order players like environmental and social activists. Apart from the need to counter the massive propaganda might of the strongest lobby groups, it ignores an important trend in affluent, notionally democratic nations at least since the thatcherite/reganite revolution of the early 1980’s . A simple or even large majority is not enough to persuade elite power structures to roll over and implement policies that directly threaten their own power (eg Iraq war 2003).

On the other hand the DIY approach has some important advantages as a political change pathway. Firstly the DIY approach that reflects permaculture ethics and design principles behaves as a systemic strike of labour, skill and capital against the debt financing by banks, globalized production controlled by corporations and central government taxation dependent on constantly rising GDP. I have argued in Crash On Demand, that a 50% reduction in consumption, work and investment by 10% of the global middle class could be enough to severely undermine the power of these global systems (that are already teetering due to the massive global unpayable debt burdens)

Whatever the effects on centralized systems, the experience of building the parallel systems from the bottom up will expose the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats through a rapid learning cycle. In the process we can better articulate a larger scale public policy agenda that would allow the next level of adoption and adaption as well as clarifying the design characteristics necessary for any truly useful larger scale government or corporate driven solutions.

The response of the centralized power structures to such a systemic strike might be to introduce draconic regulations and politically demonise those pursuing DIY enlightened self interest. We should expect more of this but there are limits to how effective such responses might be. Firstly the diffuse, even invisible nature of many of these personal and household strategies makes them inherently difficult to control. Recent attempts to control raw milk in Victoria are likely to be as ineffective as drug prohibition – every man and his dog now admits has failed despite massive resources and efforts on the part of the state. Secondly demonizing raw milk consumers and gardeners is somewhat harder than doing the same to so-called radical Islamists.

The alternative more hopeful response of centralized power might be to engage in political discourse to encourage the striking minority to come back into the fold. “We need your consumption and your creativity, what would you like to be paid to be part of the Team (Australia)” Being relatively autonomous gives us much more political leverage than being part of a mass movement of completely dependent consumers and indebted workers.

In the Brown Tech future that I believe we are increasingly locked into – nationally and globally – I think there will still be some opportunities for constructive dialogue with those trying to bring about top down change either with/through government or corporations; but we should expect that some of these opportunities will almost inevitably turn the solution back into the problem. In the face of unfolding environmental, geological, economic and geopolitical crises, the ability to ‘speak truth to power’ in defense of dispossessed people and voiceless nature will become more symbolic that effective in achieving resilience let alone justice.

On the other hand, the urgency in building the parallel systems on the conceptual and geographic fringes (edges and margins principle) will grow and the interest from those wanting to participate with their hands and hearts will increase to a flood. The ability to replicate workable alternatives to the strictures of contracting but monopolistic centralized systems will be a challenge for permaculture activists.

At the moment, turning the tide of the majority to our way would be more of a destructive tsunami than a surfable wave. If we can prove to ourselves that we can enjoy life living more healthy and resilient lives, less dependent on centralized systems while massively reducing our ecological footprint in the process, then we provide a pattern than others can copy. At the same time we contribute the diversity of solutions that can model whatever utility and hope remains for system-wide reform and redesign. And if that fails at least we lived the solution and have a multiplicity of lifeboats that give the best chance of saving the useful bits and even the essence of wisdom from a failing civilization for the emergence of the next.

Zooming back from the over-the-horizon big picture to the here and now, I would like to suggest ways in which we can make the DIY and DIO strategies achieve their great potential for positive change.

DIY suggests a learning process with less than perfect results, but if we want others to copy us then the work of reviewing, debugging and refining our solutions is essential. The fact that permaculture has generated a lot of half baked outcomes by people who are “jacks of all trades but masters of none”, is to some extent an inevitable outcome of the experimental and generalist integrated nature of permaculture solutions. However to establish any credibility – let alone have others copy us – requires food gardens that are abundant, compost toilets that smell sweet and lifestyles that are attractive to at least a motivated minority. We don’t need to dumb permaculture down for the masses but it does need to work at least on the terms of those who are interested.

We need to admit and correct our mistakes, and avoid the error of suggesting a given permaculture technique, species or even strategy is applicable everywhere. (It is the principles and ethics that are universal)

Most of all in celebrating our being jacks and jills of all trades, we should aim – at least in maturity – to also become masters and mistresses of one. One trade that can allow us to be truly useful members of relocalising communities where many may not recognize permaculture understandings – let alone p c ideology – as having any value. Energy descent futures, especially of the Brown Tech variation will not necessarily see permaculture as widely appreciated.

While this first issue [specify the issue]is about the reality and perception of effective solutions that have the power to spread, the second is about the degree to which apparently practical and effective permaculture designs are leading to substantial decoupling from the globalized economies that are now degrading humanity’s future.

In the same way that it is not clear that renewable technologies can proliferate without abundant fossil fuels and debt financing, it is not clear that when we live our permaculture lifestyle we are not just participating in global degradation through more indirect pathways.

I believe the holistic nature of permaculture can allow us to progressively integrate our personal, household, enterprise and communal systems. These systems can more and more support and stimulate, first the non monetary economies, and secondly businesses controlled by natural persons, as we progressively disengage from support for and dependency on businesses run by non natural persons (corporations) that are structurally immune to ethical influence. How to do this with one arm tied behind our back and hopping on one leg is a balancing act to say the least. (eg coming to Tassie on the Ferry)

We need to demonstrate that the DIY and DIO strategies of permaculture are workable, enjoyable and empowering but most of all that they can spread, if not like wildfire, then like a cool burn (or a compost culture) that regenerates the understory of our brittle and flammable communities.

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Fair, real and local food

About one hundred people gathered on the steps of the Victorian parliament house on 19 Feb 2015 to rally for fair, real and local food. Organised by Regrarians, the rally attendants heard from Lisa Heenan (Regrarians), Costa Georgiadis (Gardening Australia), Cyndi O’Meara (Changing Habits), Joel Salatin (Polyface Farms), Tammi Jonas (Jonai Farms), Reg Matthews (Miranda Dale dairy), Lorraine Pratley (Australian Raw Milk Movement) as well as David Holmgren and Su Dennett from Melliodora.

For those people who  missed the great day of action in Melbourne, here’s a video recording of the whole rally.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkLjQWukrmo&w=560&h=315]

David Holmgren edit

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyBPTrr82Jo&w=560&h=315]

Su Dennett edit

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9I2vWLl5By0&w=560&h=315]

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Great debate, the video

My essay “Crash On Demand” was the primary influence in framing this year’s Great debate at the Sustainable Living Festival in Melbourne,  so we felt that I had to make time to be there (in the middle of our Rocklyn Ashram residential PDC  plus peak fruit and honey harvest).

With an audience of over 250 it was an opportunity to explain the logic of bottom up permaculture activism in response to the energy descent future and hear some of the other perspectives presented. The dichotomy of the unwieldy title, the dreaded C word and the “vote” gave me the gripes, but it was good fun and an opportunity to catch up with Nicole Foss after our joint public speaking tour last winter.

Here’s yours truly kicking off the debate.

 youtube.com/watch?v=roO5FJZNmBM&w=560&h=315

For those people who want to see the whole debate (nearly 2hr long, but you should), here is the entire Great Debate (Nicole Foss, about 35 min mark. About 1.20 min mark begins the summing up, voting and Q and A).

[vimeo 119722889 w=500 h=281]

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Feb is sustainability month

February is a great time to be in Melbourne. The weather is warm and the whole city is abuzz with “sustainability” events. Albeit only for a month, it is still warming to see a whole lot of people embracing the concept of sustainability.

greatdebatebannerNaturally the man who once chose the subtitle of his book to read “principles and pathways beyond sustainability” is in demand at such a time. As we reported here earlier David Holmgren is taking the stage with some of the sharpest thinkers and keen doers to discuss whether to collapse or not to on Feb 13. More about the great debate here.

In the following week on Feb 19, he and Su Dennett from Melliodora go to Melbourne to take part in “#EatBuyGrow Rally + Event” organised by Regrarians. Both David and Su will be addressing the rally during the day and the evening event alongside Joel Salatin (‘World’s Most Innovative Farmer’ ), Costa Georgiadis (Gardening Australia), Cyndi O’Meara (Changing habits), Belinda Hagan (2013 Victorian Farmer of the Year), Tammi Jonas (Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance President) and many many others.

The day is aims to raise awareness of what producers are going through due to irrational government regulations which seem to want to sever ties with urban consumers. This is the rally bit, but the day is also for celebration of the regenerative food system of producers, chefs and consumers all maintaining vibrant connection with each other. So, why don’t you join us?

Then on Feb 28th, at the invitation of one of the residents, none other than Greg Foyster, David is going to present “Retrofitting the suburbs” at Murundaka Cohousing Communityhttps_proxy. It is a whole day event, Solar Saturday Lounge Party, to raise funds to install solar panels on the community building. David will take part along with Melliodora’s Su Dennett in the “Hypotheticals” panel discussion chaired by Rod Quantock in the afternoon. Why don’t you come down for a whole great fun filled day at Heidelberg Heights?

 

 

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Surviving earth in Canberra

SE movie poster A3 DHOne of the ways to make sense of long distance traveling is to maximise the purposes of the trip.  In a similar way that filling the car with passengers when one needs to drive somewhere gives maximum fuel efficiency, when David travels for a speaking engagement he hopes to appear more than once. So when it was announced that David Holmgren was to give a talk in Australia’s capital city, you might have wondered what would be his other engagements and programs while in the region?

Well, on the evening before the “Future scenarios and solutions” talk in Canberra, the renowned film director Peter Charles Downey is going to show his new film, Surviving earth, in which David is featured, so David will be taking part in a panel discussion following the screening, along with Prof. Ian Lowe, Julian Cribb, Prof. Stephen Bygrave, Peter Tait and the director, Peter Charles Downey himself. MC is Jenny Goldie from Sustainable Population Australia. 

Here’s the film trailer.

If you are in the zone, come and join him on Dec 7, at Finkel theatre, ANU.

On the day after the talk on 9th Dec, David will be touring a great example of good local land care .

 

 

 

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Wild side of sustainability

?????????????????????During the coldest months of August people in the Central Highlands of Victoria celebrate a month long festival of words every year. Words in Winter is ” a celebration of words, stories and ideas in all their forms shared by locals and visiting presenters through readings, poetry, theatre, music, talks, workshops, visiting authors, and exhibitions.” Hepburn Relocalisation Network will stage Yarns on the wild side of sustainability on Sunday August 3rd. Local speakers will spin their yarns about their experience in the pursuit of more reasonable living.

Taking the stage amongst local sustainability bunch to discuss the wildside is David Holmgren,  hot on the heels of his national tour with Nicole Foss. In Sci fi Hepburn David will discuss scenarios. Are they imaginary or real?

It is a free event, and should be a cracker afternoon at the Rex Arcade lounge.

Talking about the Rex on August 3rd, our resident nonagenarian poet Venie Holmgren will also be taking the stage in the morning. She will be performing her stuff  in “Poetry morning”. A must-see performance as well.

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‘Survive and Thrive’ Foss and Holmgren to tour

Strategies for a changing economy, survive and thrive –

We are approaching many limits to growth over the next several decades, and are consequently facing many challenges in our immediate future. Finance, energy, environment, resources and climate will all impact on the single-minded, one-dimensional trajectory human society has been on in our era of growth imperative. Our current path is unsustainable. It cannot and will not continue, so we must adapt our societies in order to build a new future.

The first challenges are being presented by the on-going global financial crisis, which is far closer to its beginning than it end, and by the geopolitics of energy. Events in Europe, particularly in Cyprus, Detroit and latterly the Ukraine, represent a major wake up call that financial crisis is about to resume in earnest and that energy issues are moving towards criticality in many places. We must anticipate and navigate a period of rapid economic contraction and increasing risk of resource conflict, punctuated by the emergence of geopolitical wildcards.

Building Resilience in an Era of Limits to Growth

Nicole Foss will explore the links between the converging pressures facing us – economic contraction, peak energy and geopolitical stress. She will outline her latest thoughts on the implications for our everyday lives and share practical solutions she has observed recently from around the world.

 

Permaculture Surfing the Property Bubble Dumpers

Drawing from 30 years of permaculture teaching, designing and demonstrating rural and urban agriculture food production systems for sustainable living, Transition activism and personal example, David Holmgren will outline practical strategies to help households and communities survive, thrive and contribute to a better world.

Permaculture co-founder and the author of  Future Scenarios, David Holmgren toured the country with Richard Heinberg in 2006 informing the public of the threats of imminent peak oil and the permaculture responses. Eight years on, more people have installed insulation and solar, started growing food, raising chooks, and buying from local producers.

Also eight years on, the peak of conventional oil is already in the rear view mirror and the first stage of the second Great Depression is pulling apart economies and nations around the world. The mining boom has allowed Australia to dodge the worst, but the signs are not good. Government plans for austerity highlight the need for households and communities to increase their self reliance.

david_holmgren_talking_2013David’s updated presentation uses permaculture design principles to interpret the signs and show how getting out of debt, downsizing and rebooting our dormant household and community non-monetary economies are the best hedges that ordinary citizens can make. The idea that these household and community economies could achieve unprecedented growth rates if the monetary economy takes a serious dive is a good news story you won’t hear from mainstream media.  The shift of metaphor from ‘retrofitting’ to ‘surfing’ suggests a stronger role for positive risk taking behaviour change without the need for expensive changes to the built environment that few will be able to afford.  Returning to Aussie St, David shows how the permaculture makeover and behaviour change is progressing through the Second Great Depression.  Aussie St is not only surviving but thriving through the “dumpers” that property bubble collapse, climate chaos and geopolitical energy shocks have unleashed on the lucky country.  An endearing, amusing and gutsy story of hope for in-situ adaptation by the majority of Australians living in our towns and suburbs.

On this tour David Holmgren is joined by Nicole Foss, leading system analyst, who explains how the deflationary dynamics that always follow finance and property bubbles, will rapidly impact individuals, families and communities, while the longer acting forces of Peak Oil and Climate Change will determine and limit the nature of any economic recovery. Nicole will paint a comprehensive picture of where we stand today globally, how our human operating system functions, how and why it is acutely vulnerable, and what we must do about the predicament in which we find ourselves. The focus will be financial, social, and geopolitical, reflecting the priority of impacts likely to be felt in the relatively short term. The critical factors for change will be highlighted, with an outline of the possibilities that exist within the scope of the emerging reality. We must plan to restructure our societies from the bottom up, so that both the transition period and our eventually recovery from the coming upheaval, can rest on a solid foundation. That foundation requires the resurgence of resilient communities and the development of true human capacity.

nicole_foss_portrait_2014Her succinct and riveting presentation sets the scene for the positive permaculture strategies. More than just an affirmation of what many are already doing, Foss’s systemic perspective is a wake up call for those concerned about environmental and social issues to understand how their own exposure to financial collapse will determine whether they can shape a better future for themselves, their children and their communities.

The two will inform Australians how it’s possible, although not inevitable, to weather the coming storms with grace, rebuild community solidarity and provide a bulwark against the worst expressions of fear, blame and xenophobia, that naturally arise in times of hardship.  Most importantly, it will highlight how a small but significant minority following a path of enlightened self interest, and informed by permaculture design principles, may have a more powerful and positive influence than mass movements demanding their rights from weak and ineffective governments.

Humanity stands on the edge of a precipice, and where we go from here is in our own hands. There is both considerable danger, and the opportunity to address constructively what is arguably the most challenging situation in human history.

 

Survive and Thrive with Nicole Foss and David Holmgren
(for the details of each event and booking, please click the link.)

 

June 27 Sydney

June 29  Narara Ecovillage (9am)
June 29 (Sun) Newcastle (3pm)

June 30 (Mon) “Crash or crash through” workshop (Holmgren) at Hunter TAFE in Newcastle

“Building resilience in an era of limits to growth” workshop (Foss) at Hunter TAFE in Newcastle
Building resilience, with Nicole Foss in Port Stephens (Foss)

July 3 (Thu) “Crash or crash through” workshop at Bellbunya (9am)
July 3 (Thu) Sunshine Coast (6.00pm)

July 4 (Fri) Brisbane (6pm)
July 6 (Sun) Fremantle (10am)
July 8 (Tue) “Crash or crash through” workshop in Fremantle (Holmgren)
July 13 (Sun) “Crash or crash through” workshop (Holmgren) at Creative Collective in Lara near Geelong
July 11 (Fri) Daylesford (7pm)
July 15 (Tue) Melbourne (7pm)
July 19 (Sat) Hobart (Holmgren) (6.30pm)

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Permaculture and Festivals

picAs we reported earlier, David Holmgren will give a presentation at Rainbow Serpent Festival over the Australia Day weekend in January 2014. He will discuss the very apt subject on  “Permaculture and Festivals; fringe delusion and degeneration or action at the edge?” reflecting on his own experiences in both.

Permaculture and music festivals have been prominent expressions of the counterculture in Australia over the last three decades. What can young people salvage from that history as they find their way in a mad world, fix the mess and enjoying the trip?  Permaculture co-founder David Holmgren paints the big picture with amazing stories of festivals where permaculture was first in action, knock on impacts around the world and the opportunities amongst the crap of the unfolding Brown Tech future.

Do not miss the chance to hear his talk at Rainbow 2014.

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Bill Gammage to talk in Daylesford

resized_9781742377483_224_297_FitSquareBill Gammage, the veteran historian and author of the ground breaking book, The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines Made Australia, will give a talk at the Daylesford Town Hall on Friday Nov 29. Bill Gammage is adjunct professor in the Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University.

In this multi-award winning book, Bill refutes the common notion that pre-1788 Aboriginal people had no system of land management, on the contrary he shows that the people who lived here then had developed, over many generations, a complex, elaborate system of management to ensure the survival of their culture.

He suggests that time spent maintaining the landscape was a cultural obligation of great import. There’s an exhibition of works by colonial artist Thomas Clark at the Hamilton Art Gallery, a room full of 1850-60’s views of the western district ……wide open spaces, clear of stumps. Clark and other artists of the day had no agenda to paint anything other than what they saw. Where are the trees, now so plentiful?

Gammage uses written accounts by explorers and historians, and early landscape views (sketches, paintings, etc) to explain how Aborigines created an ideal landscape for obtaining the variety of food items they needed in their diet, and kept the countryside clear of dense vegetation (and thus dangerous fires).

The indigenous Australians were more efficient than Europeans, Bill asserts, in getting food, shelter and other needs from the land, mostly by the use of fire and manipulation of the life-cycles of food plants.

Once the fire-based land management systems was removed with the arrival of Europeans, the continent became overgrown and thus more fire prone (made worse, as well, by the climate changing to a much drier one). With The Biggest Estate on Earth, Bill  has updated the history of Australia, and our way of seeing our land.  If his conclusions will be debated, they speak directly to contemporary concerns with land and land care. The central premise of The Biggest Estate on Earth is that before white settlement, the continent had been looked after by  mindful and meticulous caretakers.

The talk is organised by the Hepburn Relocalisation Network. Do not miss this rare opportunity.

Entry $10/$8 pre booked  $15/$12 at the door

Here is Bill Gammage talking about the book.

Review on the Wheeler Centre website.

(The recording of his talk, introduced by HRN’s Su Dennett is available here.)

 

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2 great reasons 2 go Rainbow Serpent 2014

mastheads_artgalleryaPlanning to get away for the Australia Day weekend next year? Thought about  going to Lexton near Ballarat  for the 2014 Rainbow Serpent Festival?

The Age  summed it up  as “an alternative lifestyle festival” where the punters “come for the electronic music, healing workshops and mind-bending art”. Being a big fan of the ambient electro dub house music, one worker at Melliodora is more than keen to check out the Orb who will headline the stage. The rest of the lineup of musicians and DJs is good too. But, no, they are not  the only reasons we are looking forward to attending this world renowned festival held in a small local town (pop.200) in central Victoria.

One of the reasons is that David will give a presentation in the “Lifestyle Village”,  a “space for the Rainbow Serpent family to come together in a time of celebration and community”.  At the time of writing we don’t know when he will appear, or what he is going to talk about,  but we will let you know as more details come in hand.

Also sending a strong message of permaculture at the festival along with David, is the uke troubadour Charlie Mgee,  back home from his globe trotting in the northern hemisphere for six months of this year. The trip culminated in his appearance at the legendary Glastonbury Festival in July. He will hit the stage at around 4.30pm on Jan 25. Be there and ready for the mighty Vegman in action.

So, here are two (three?) good reasons to spend your January long weekend in Lexton. The festival tickets are apparently selling fast, so book early, and avoid disappointment.

Rainbow Serpent Festival website

 

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