Tag Archives | Talk

Garden States – Cultivating Ethnobotanical Plant Knowledge

Garden States 2021 – A Forum for Cultivating Ethnobotanical Plants, Knowledge, and Community.

David Holmgren will be presenting at this event: two full days of ethnobotanical knowledge sharing and discussion on psychedelic plants and culture, ethnobotany, conservation, research, science, and art. Get your hands dirty and learn to grow and share ethnobotanical plants with the experts.

The program will explore relationships between humankind and plants, including gardening, conservation and sustainability, culture, art, spirituality, philosophy, research and politics. Garden States is designed to encourage community building around medicinal plants, research, and psychedelic culture.

Get your hands dirty and learn from the experts on how to grow and share ethnobotanical plants. Participate in community-lead learning and meet like-minded botanical folk from across Australia.

The main conference will take place on Friday, October 1st and Saturday, October 2nd. On Sunday, October 3rd, we will host an informal community social day, which will include a plant meet and book swap in the afternoon.

The Garden States conference will have multiple stages hosting simultaneous presentations, as well as a bustling, ethnobotanical marketplace. We hope you can attend this special event. Join us in planting seeds for earth, body, and mind.

There will now be two full days of formal content, including lectures from some amazing presenters predominantly from Australia and New Zealand. Guests will include, but will in no way be limited to Bruce PascoeJanet LaurenceDavid HolmgrenAlison PouliotKeeper TroutDavid Nickles and Margaret Ross.

Garden States 2021 will be an expanded version of the program we’d planned to deliver in 2020 but moved due to Covid 19. Given the circumstances, some minor changes to the program and the way we run events in a COVID-19 world may occur.

Entheogenesis Australis is a charitable, educational organisation established in 2004. We provide opportunities for critical thinking and knowledge sharing on ethnobotanical plants, fungi, nature, and sustainability. Through our conferences and workshops, we aim to celebrate the culture, art, politics and community around medicine plants in the hope to better wellbeing for humankind and the planet.

As our last few EGA symposiums and events have sold out well in advance, and tickets are strictly limited, we highly recommend booking your Garden States tickets early. There are no single-day passes; We offer discounted tickets for First Nations people, as well as concession & hardship tickets. Young adults need to attend with a guardian and have tickets purchased by a guardian on their behalf.

Garden States 2021 will offer much more than even our most enthusiastic botanical minded friends could have hoped. With that in mind, we hope to see you all at this extraordinary ethnobotanical event and wish you, your family, and communities all the best over the coming months.

More details here

Book your tickets here

0

Melbourne Design Week Panel

Speculations on the future of food and farming with Green Renaissance panel, featuring David Holmgren, followed by a screening of ‘Soylent Green’.

About this Event

6.00pm Green Renaissance panel talk:

To compliment the Green Renaissance exhibition running at Queen Victoria Market, this panel talk will deepen the conversation about the speculative future of food and farming.

In about 60 years’ time, the world will run out of quality topsoil, the non-renewable resource we currently rely on to grow 95 percent of our food. Intensive farming practices and anthropogenic activities in general are to blame. How will we feed ourselves?

Moderated by Dr Ollie Cotsaftis, this panel features David Holmgren, environmental designer and co-originator of the permaculture concept; University of Melbourne Associate Professor Alex Johnson, a researcher in the fields of plant nutrition and bio-fortification; and RMIT University Dr Pirjo Haikola, a designer and a researcher working on regenerative marine design projects, and whose current work Urchin Corals is exhibited at the NGV Triennial.

7.30pm Soylent Green screening:

In a densely overpopulated, starving New York City of the future, NYPD detective Robert Thorn (Charlton Heston) investigates the murder of an executive at rations manufacturer Soylent Corporation. With the help of elderly academic Solomon “Sol” Roth (Edward G. Robinson), Thorn begins to make real progress — until the governor mysteriously pulls the plug. Obsessed with the mystery, Thorn steps out from behind the badge and launches his own investigation into the murder.

First doors open: 5.00pm

Green Renaissance Panel Talk: 6.00pm

Second doors open: 7.15pm

Film screens: 7.30pm (97 minutes running time)

Soylent Green screens as part of The Capitol’s Past Futures film program. Early arrivals are invited to explore the exhibitions in the upstairs Salon, Lounge and Loft (first in best dressed for exhibition viewing prior to the film due to capacity limits).

Visit designweek.melbourne for the full program of screenings, events and exhibitions at The Capitol.

This event is part of Melbourne Design Week 2021, an initiative of the Victorian Government in collaboration with the NGV.

Stay in touch:

thecapitol.tv

Instagram: @thecapitolrmit

Facebook: @thecapitolrmit

Please note, by confirming your RSVP your email will be subscribed to The Capitol’s email newsletter, which you can unsubscribe from at any time.

Ge you tickets here

0

Just enough: Let’s never stop thinking about the future

Let’s never stop thinking about the future: The connections between permaculture, Japanese design and homesteading in a frugal future.

The world has changed immeasurably over the last thirty years, with ‘more, bigger, better’ being the common mantra. But in the midst of this constantly evolving world, there is a growing community of people who are looking at our history, searching for answers to issues that are faced everywhere, such as energy, water, materials, food and population crisis.

In “Just Enough, ” author Azby Brown turned to the history of Japan, where he finds several lessons on living in a sustainable society that translate beyond place and time. This book presents a compelling argument around how to forge a society that is conservation-minded, waste-free, well-housed, well-fed and economically robust, including what Edo Period life has to offer us in the global battle to reverse environmental degradation.

In contrast, RetroSuburbia, by David Holmgren shows how the Australian suburbs can be transformed to become productive and resilience in an energy descent future. It focuses on what can be done by an individual at the household level with examples from ‘Aussie Street’ story and real life case studies to support and enhance the main content.

Su Dennett and Virginia Solomon have been living and promoting a sustainable households at their respective Melliodora and Eco resilience households and wider community activities including the Hepburn Relocalisation NetworkPermaculture Australia, Holmgren Design & permaculture education to name a few. Virginia has also travelled multiple times to Japan, including meeting Azby and connecting all of the interview members here today on behalf of Permaculture Australia.

Without further ado, here is the interview:

You can read more here.

A huge thank you to Permaculture Australia for enabling this rich conversation to happen.

If you’re interested in more crossovers between Japanese culture and permaculture, you might be interested to read David’s journal from 2004, when he and Su spent 4 weeks travelling around Japan:

Permaculture in Japan: foreign idea or indigenous design.

1

Annual General Meeting: Guest Speaker David Holmgren

Macedon Ranges Sustainability Group Annual General Meeting

Sunday, 25 October 2020

3:00 pm 4:15 pm

The topic for David’s presentation is:

RetroSuburbia and Rural Resettlement; how will our regions respond to the stresses and opportunities of Covid triggered change

REGISTER TO ATTEND

Zoom details for David Holmgren’s presentation and the following AGM will be emailed out on 24th October 2020.

0

PermaQueer TEDx Countdown event

David Holmgren is proud to be speaking at PermaQueer’s 3-day online event this Thursday 15th October at 11am as part of global TedX Countdown. He’ll be speaking about the role of permaculture in designing a sustainable future, alongside many other great speakers such as Morag Gamble, Brenna Quinlan, Charlie Mgee, Rosemary Morrow, Artist as Family and many more.

Get your free or donation based tickets here:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1006883859830500

0

Transforming the Suburbs

Please join us for this exciting forum, Transforming the Suburbs, in which the panel speakers will explore the transformative role of Australian suburbs to activate the behavioural change, cooperative-based action and practical solutions required for rapid transition to a carbon-positive low energy future.

The speakers are:
David Holmgren – Permaculture co-originator
Costa Georgiadis – Gardening Australia, ABC TV
Dominique Hes – Melbourne University
Michael Ableman – Sole Food Street Farms, Canada
Kat Lavers – Permaculture practitioner

The event will be MC’d by Nick Ritar from Milkwood Permaculture.

This expert panel will creatively explore sustainable actions, key strategies and resilience-based concepts for future suburban responses to localised and global ecological challenges. The audience will be provided expert analysis and thought-provoking ideas on how suburbia will be a vital place to survive and thrive in challenging futures. Discussion will actively engage and inform event participants about multi-faceted transitional change ideas that positively contribute toward low-energy and carbon positive sustainable home and community living.

For anyone interested in permaculture, or a shift towards creatively adapting to a more sustainable way of living, this free event is not to be missed.

Cost: Free

0

Keith Roby Memorial Lecture

Last month while David was in Perth for the Australasian Permaculture Convergence he gave The Keith Roby Memorial Lecture in Community Science, a free public lecture funded by the Keith Roby Trust, established in memory of Dr Roby.

Keith Roby was a foundation member of Murdoch University and a pioneer in the area of “Community Science”, the phrase he coined to reflect the ideal of science and technology directed towards human fulfillment, social well-being and satisfying the fundamental needs of humankind. He believed science could make a significant contribution towards resolving major contemporary issues such as the dilemmas surrounding the environment; energy; resources and genetic engineering.

With a deep commitment to interdisciplinary teaching and research, he initiated research and founded courses in the areas of science, technology, society and energy studies.

Each year a distinguished speaker is invited to deliver a lecture that builds on Dr Keith Roby’s life’s work. This year, David Holmgren was asked to give the memorial lecture. The topic of David’s presentation was Permaculture: four decades of education, design and action for a sustainable future. In his talk David discussed the evolution of permaculture from environmental design, to the social and psychological design of the “inner landscape”, and addressed the question about the relationship between permaculture and spirituality. Thanks to Oliver for the following photos:

keith-roby-lecture-wa-2016-2

keith-roby-lecture-wa-2016-3

keith-roby-lecture-wa-2016-4

You can listen to a podcast of the event here:

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/289097016″ params=”auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&visual=true” width=”100%” height=”200″ iframe=”true” /]

 

And you can read the full transcript here.

0

Honouring Bill Mollison

In memory of Bill Mollison, David helped his son Oliver plant dozens of trees at Oliver’s place, near Fryers Forest. They were mostly food producing and included carob and pistachio trees. #plantedforbill

billmemorialtreeplaning-3_l

billmemorialtreeplaning-2_l

Oliver also styled and snapped this photo of his father paying homage to Bill and the photo that David took of him on a plant and seed collecting trip in northern Tasmania in 1975.

billmemorialtreeplaning-1_lbm

If you haven’t already heard Charlie Mgee’s beautiful tribute to Bill, you can listen to it here:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MN_Texj9CD4]

Radio National’s Blueprint for Living had a segment called ‘Farewell to the father of the global permaculture movement’ devoted to Bill Mollison and featured David talking about Bill and more broadly about permaculture.

Samuel Alexander wrote a piece for The Conversation about Bill entitled ‘A revolution disguised as organic gardening’.

Declan Kennedy’s tribute, I am mourning my friend Bill Mollison is also well worth a read.

0

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity

In 2015 a small community formed an emerging ecovillage in Gippsland, Victoria, and challenged themselves to explore a radically simpler way of life based on material sufficiency, frugality, permaculture, alternative technology and local economy. Made by Jordan Osmond and Samuel Alexander, A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity is a documentary that tells the story of this community’s living experiment, in the hope of sparking a broader conversation about the challenges and opportunities of living in an age of limits.

The documentary also presents new and exclusive interviews with leading activists and educators in the world’s most promising social movements, including David Holmgren (permaculture), Helena Norberg-Hodge (localisation), Ted Trainer (the simpler way), Nicole Foss (energy and finance), Bill Metcalf (intentional communities) and Graham Turner (limits to growth).

FILM PREMIER DETAILS

Friday, June 3, 2016 from 6:15 PM to 9:30 PM.
Victorian Trades Hall Council (New Council Chambers) – 54 Victoria Street, Carlton, VIC 3053.

Doors open at 6.15pm, with time to mingle before Samuel Alexander introduces the film at 6.45pm. The screening begins at 7pm. After the film at 8.30pm, the filmmakers will welcome comments and questions about the issues raised, and a panel, including David Holmgren, will also answer questions. The evening will wrap up around 9.30pm.

There will be nibbles and drinks prior to the screening. Please bring your own cup/mug to minimise the use of recyclables.

You can pre-order tickets here.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEYREEnymnk]

2

Land Cultures: shared knowledges

Bruce Pascoe and David Holmgren to meet and share knowledges

Award-winning Australian writer, editor and anthologist Bruce Pascoe is leading a movement of researchers that is rewriting Aboriginal history in Australia.

On Thursday April 7 2016 Pascoe will visit Daylesford for a series of free events including Land Cultures: Aboriginal economies and permaculture futures at the Daylesford Town Hall at 7.30pm – Bruce Pascoe in conversation with David Holmgren.

LandCultures_jpeg_lThe evening event will commence with a Dja Dja Wurrung smoking ceremony and Welcome to Country. A Hepburn Shire Council representative will present a progress report on the Shire’s recognition and reconciliation projects. Pascoe’s keynote address will be followed by a response from David Holmgren, before opening the discussion to the floor. Supper will be provided by Hepburn Relocalisation Network (for a gold coin donation).

Come and join the discussion and understand how the foods of Australia pre-1788 may become the foods of a climate-altered 21st century economy that acknowledge and celebrate the past. You can join the Facebook event here.

Other free events on the day include:

2pm tour of Dja Dja Wurrung tools at the Daylesford Museum.
3pm reading by Bruce of his young adult fiction at the Daylesford Library.
4pm planting of murnongs (yam daisies) at the Daylesford Library community garden.

All events are presented by the Hepburn Relocalisation Network with the generous assistance and funding of the Hepburn Shire Council.

* * *

Bruce Pascoe has a Bunurong and Tasmanian heritage. In his latest book, Dark Emu: black seeds, Pascoe shows that the Aboriginal history we were taught in school — that indigenous Australians were chancey hunter-gatherer nomads — is a fiction. Using point of contact journals by European explorers, Pascoe demonstrates the extent of the ecologically sensitive agricultural practices that existed in Australia pre-1788, and shows that Aboriginal Australians were possibly the world’s first bread makers, preceding the Egyptians by at least 18,000 years.

2