Permaculture News

For the Wild podcast

David Holmgren on a Quiet Boycott

At the end of 2020, David recorded this interview with Ayana, which has just gone live.

As so-called powerful “industrial civilizations” continue to decline into dysfunction, unable to care for the vast majority, the call to localize, reinvest in household economies, and strengthen our capacity for self-reliance is becoming emphatic. Amongst failing institutions and the remnants of exploitative wealth, this week’s guest, David Holmgren, encourages us to lean into crisis as a temporary portal that allows us to focus on the potential of all that lies around us. In conversation David explores creative reuse, salvage economies, ethical relationships, permaculture, and the intricacies of mass movements that are trying to override a system that is deeply committed to a machination of consumerism and debt.

Lauded as one of the co-originators of permaculture, we begin our conversation looking at how permaculture differentiates itself from organic gardening and agroforestry, while discussing the more salient critiques of permaculture in terms of appropriation, class, and privilege. David offers honest reflections on the origins of permaculture and its accessibility, while also defining the importance of a quiet boycott and how class privilege factors into our efforts to reduce degrees of dependency.

You can listen to the podcast in its entirety here

Comments

3 thoughts on “For the Wild podcast”

  1. I’m living in Vietnam, while listening to this podcast, David mentioned his colleagues who observed creative recycling material in Vietnam. Would you like letting me know who David’s colleague is and how I can get in touch with him/her?

Other News

Essential Bushfire Safety Tips – 3rd Edition

Bushfire has been a recurring theme in my work over nearly four decades and a central concern for anyone involved in permaculture design, teaching and practice in rural Australia, especially the south east of the continent, which has the dubious title of being the most bushfire prone region in the world.

Read More »

People’s Choice Online Vote is now open

The portrait of David Holmgren, painted by Eugene von Nagy, was a finalist in The Lester Prize, the third largest portrait prize in Australia, after the Moran and Archibald. Voting is now open for the People’s Choice Online Vote.

Read More »

Pandemic Brooding translated into French

David’s latest writing, “Pandemic Brooding: Can the Permaculture movement survive the first severe test of the energy descent future?” has now been translated into French, which you can download as a PDF at the top of this page: https://holmgren.com.au/writing/pandemic-brooding/

Read More »
Scroll to Top