Permaculture Pioneers: stories from the new frontier - Book
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Permaculture Pioneers: stories from the new frontier

$20.00$25.00

This book charts a history of the first three decades of permaculture, through the personal stories of Australian permaculturists.

From permaculture co-originator David Holmgren, to ABC TV’s Gardening Australia presenter Josh Byrne, the authors span the generations and the continent.

Available as a physical book, or as downloads in both .ePub and .pdf formats.

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Product Description

Arguably permaculture is one of Australia’s greatest intellectual exports, having helped people worldwide to design ecologically sustainable strategies for their homes, gardens, farms and communities. This book explores social and inner change for sustainability, charting a history of the first three decades of permaculture, through the personal stories of Australian permaculturists. From permaculture co-originator David Holmgren, to ABC Gardening Australia presenter Josh Byrne, the authors span the generations and the continent.

These stories represent the scope, depth and diversity of Australian permaculture. They explore some of the influences on those who have embraced it, record milestones and highlight recurring themes. The editors’ contributions and afterword by social ecologist Professor Stuart B Hill frame the stories in terms of transformation of the inner landscape of our minds and hearts, as the critical starting point for the outer change that is needed.

For Australians and others around the world whose lives have been changed by permaculture, this book provides a context for articulating and celebrating their own stories and experiences. Even more, it invites each of us, permaculturists or not, to embrace our power in designing our world out of the best in ourselves, for the benefit of the whole earth community.

Like tough, resilient pioneer plants with their ability to grow in barren and hostile ground, social pioneers work courageously at the edges of accepted norms, bringing new ideas and opportunities. They build knowledge, experience and new perspectives – fertile soil for those who follow.

Pioneering Permies

Top row editors Caroline Smith and Kerry Dawborn and stories from David Holmgren, Terry White, Robyn Francis, Max Lindegger, Vries Gravestein. Second row Jeff Nugent, Geoff Lawton, Russ Grayson, Fiona Campbell, Annemarie & Graham Brookman, Rosemary Morrow. Third row Martha Hills, Janet Millington, Robin Clayfield, Alanna Moore, Naomi Coleman, Virginia Solomon, Ross Mars. Bottom row Jill Finnane, Ian Lillington, Jane Scott, Josh Byrne, Tony Jansen, Morag Gamble and afterword by Stuart B. Hill.

The physical version of this book is 150mm wide x 215mm high, 384 pages, black and white. Printed in Australia on PEFC endorsed paper.

The .pdf version of this eBook is around 10.2MB, the .ePub version is around 19MB. You can choose to download either or both formats. We recommend that you read our read our Frequently Asked Questions before making a download purchase.

If you have any questions or experience any problems with your download purchase on your first attempt read our Frequently Asked Questions before contacting us.

Additional Information

Weight .550 kg
Dimensions 215 x 150 x 22 mm

Reviews

  1. Richard Telford

    :

    Review by Diane Reynolds of Green Energy Times, view the original here.

    A treasure trove of permaculture lore, this book is brought to you in an extremely engaging format … lots of baby memoirs — memoirettes — of permaculture practitioners.

    Permaculture is the comprehensive term for living sustainability on the planet with principles rooted in ecology and social justice. It’s a pretty snappy phrase: care of earth, care of people, share the surplus. Or, in popular form, Earth Care, People Care, Fair Share.

    The dedication says it all. “We dedicate this book to those with spirit and courage, past, present and future, who show us that a sustainable and just world is within our power. We simply have to choose it and make it happen.”

    Royalties from book sales are donated to the Permaculture Pioneers Fund, supporting permaculture-related environmental and social justice projects and initiatives around the world.

    A “child of Australia”, permaculture was conceived and developed in the small state of Tasmania in the early 1970’s by co-originators Bill Mollison and David Holmgren. Since then it has spread to 160 countries.

    “Thru their deep understanding of natural ecosystems, traditional small-scale mixed agriculture, low-impact technology and social justice into an interconnected dynamic system of design principles for creating self-sustaining human settlements” writes Smith.

    Mollison moved it horizontal and Holmgren did the vertical work. It was the ”larger-than-life personality” of Mollison that made permaculture known the world over. It was Holmgren and others who have tested and practiced it in many ways, shapes and forms.

    Adherents, “permies”, come in all stripes: some rigidly dogmatic and others more loosely flexible. The movement has been most successful on the local, small level – but what’s needed, say the editors, is larger systemic change. One contributor, Geoff Lawton, wrote “Think Big” about his experiences working for systemic changes around the world.

    This collection of 25 stories of those involved, in different ways, in the “extraordinary design system for sustainability known as permaculture” covers a range of perspectives – old/young, male/female, from very different backgrounds and locations.

    Each story is a motherlode of riches … a packed blend of memoir, technical specifics from their experience with permaculture applications with accompanying successes and mistakes as well as some history of the movement.

    The reader is pulled into Max’s or Rosemary’s life or the lives of the Bookmans. Not only do they tell you something about themselves — who they are, how they became connected to the earth, and then connected to permaculture (always interesting how people wake up to a new paradigm). And then they describe their first tentative steps or, in some cases, being so disgusted with the status quo, their whopping huge plunges, into creating sustainable living environments for themselves and others.

    It’s a wonderful, readable book. Perfect for a gift. And buying it supports permaculture initiatives around the world.

  2. Richard Telford

    :

    Review by Kirsten Bradley of Milkwood Permaculture, view the original here.

    I think Permaculture Pioneers: stories from the new frontier is an important book for a couple of reasons.

    This book gives us young-uns a sense of what has gone before. We all (Milkwood very much included) ‘stand on the shoulders of giants’ in all that we’re trying to do and achieve when it comes to permaculture and regenerative agriculture theory and practice.

    And while we regularly honor the sources of the info and knowledge and skills we’ve been passed on, i like the solidity of this object, and it’s ability to un-smudge the origins of some ideas and parts of the permaculture movement.

    The book is a kind of catalog of esteemed Australian permaculturists, each telling their stories in their own words. Many people we’ve had the honor to know, work and teach with are here (Bill Mollison, David Holmgren, Rowe Morrow, Geoff Lawton, Russ Grayson) and many MANY more besides.

    While not every significant Australian permaculturalist of the last three decades is in here (Darren J Doherty didn’t get a look-in, for example), I don’t think this book is designed to be a definitive overview; rather it’s designed to give a sense of the depth and breadth of the Australian permaculture movement up to this point. And I think it does that very well.

    For better or for worse, there seem to be some schools of learning within permaculture education that do not make a focus of ‘opening up’ students to the work of other teachers and doers as much as they could. Which is a shame, because diversity equals stability and abundance, in all things.

    This could be partly due to how we access info these days – each online search leads you through a thread of links and inter-connected nodes, and before you know if you’re in a particular branch of the permaculture tree, so to speak. Some branches are more inter-connected than others.

    I think this book is most important in that it joins dots and connects people you may not have known learned from, or alongside, each other. I would have liked to see a fabulous web-like map included in this book showing how each contributor related to each other, but maybe that’s a job for an enthusiastic reader (any takers?).

    Who got inspired by who. Who worked where in relevance to when. Whose projects influenced which initiatives. Why we have the structures we have today. What has been lost. What has been found.

    Reading this book brings back something we were talking to David Holmgren about in May, the subject for his talk at the dinner we held then in Sydney: the idea of ‘waves of permaculture’, like the waves that ripple through any movement, whether it be activism, literature or industry.

    This book is an acknowledgement and an atlas of some of those waves and their side-ripples. It makes me proud to be part of something with so much thought, passion and intelligence gone before, and so much possible yet to come.

  3. Richard Telford

    :

    Review by John Seed in the Green Left Weekly, view the original here.

    Permaculture is one of Australia’s greatest intellectual exports.

    It has helped people worldwide to design ecologically sustainable strategies for their homes, gardens, farms and communities.

    The new book Permaculture Pioneers charts a history of the first three decades of permaculture through the personal stories of 25 Australian permaculturists.

    The stories in this book represent the scope, depth and diversity of Australian permaculture.

    They explore some of the influences on those who have embraced it, record milestones and highlight recurring themes.

    For Australians and others around the world whose lives have been changed by permaculture, this book provides a context for articulating and celebrating their stories and experiences.

    Even more, it invites each of us, permaculturists or not, to embrace our power in designing our world out of the best in ourselves, for the benefit of the whole Earth community.

    Like tough, resilient pioneer plants with their ability to grow in barren and hostile ground, social pioneers work courageously at the edges of accepted norms, bringing new ideas and opportunities.

    They build knowledge, experience and new perspectives — fertile soil for those who follow.

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